Unveiling the Fragilities and Faultlines of Femininity: A psychoanalytic investigation (Part II)

From “Individualizing Gender and Sexuality: Theory and Practice” by Nancy J. Chodorow (2012).

Updated: September 27, 2021; 5:27 PM

Freud himself admitted that his perspective on femininity was limited and what little he did contribute to the field of psychoanalytic was from pure observational points of view in what he considered to be “feminine behaviors.” Women to Freud, as well as the subject of femininity, must have been no different than any other psychoanalytic riddle that needed unveiling. To further this exploration, I will consider the theories of Nancy Chodorow, Lucy Holmes, Julia Kristeva as well as some other psychoanalysts and philosophers and make an investigatory attempt in unveiling “the fractures and faultlines of femininity.” This psychoanalytic investigation will undoubtedly unveil the “peculiarities” of the psychotic psychoanalytic text of object relations expounded on the original writings of Freud’s castration complex known as Oedipus. This approach opposes aspects of normal healthy development, and as we will see has several connections to the aspects to the psychotic text of Western culture (splitting) as a distinct picture of developmental immaturity as one of the faultlines of both femininity and masculinity in human development. Another interesting aspect of development will be revealed in how we learn to navigate humiliation.

Since violence and aggression are behaviors considered to be a human problem, rather than just one belonging to the masculine gender, studies have shown that serious violent and fatal aggression, as behavior peculiar to animal competition, are carried out at higher rates by the masculine gender and that femininity contributes far less to this human problem. However, this is not to say that possessed femininity is not without its own set of peculiar fragilities and faultlines. Research studies tell us that women are less likely to carry out acts of serious and fatal violent aggression (homicide), but there is a small population of women who kill their children and this can be evidenced if we include into our consideration the abortion rate. 

One of the first elements of Chodorow’s theory is connected to the idea of identity which can include aspects of national, ethnic, religious, and gendered identity as her theory deals directly with Islamic terrorism. “Humiliation seems in some way to affect men and women in different ways can be expected from the classical Freudian account of challenges to phallic narcissism and from feminist descriptions … beginning with Horney, of the humiliation of being a little boy in relation to grown women (Chodorow, 2012, pp. 130).” However, the theory Chodorow develops she calls The Achilles Complex ties directly into Freudian castration anxiety/complex (Freud’s Oedipus) and borrows on the masculine Father-Son vertical and its power dynamic as witnessed in Freud’s patient Little Hans and Han’s fear of his father’s large and castrating phallus (Freud, 1909; Freud, 1924; Chassegeut-Smirgel, 1984). In order for us to uncover the fractures and faultlines of femininity it will require an understanding of the work of other feminist authors, philosophers, and psychoanalysts writing on the Mother-Daughter relationship and its power dynamic rooted in the paranoid splitting of Melanie Klein, and to which Chodorow and Lucy Holmes both borrow from as well.

To reiterate from my previous post, “The Fragilities and Faultlines of Masculinity,” based on the theory of Nancy Chodorow, borrowed from Freudian psychology and re-worked through Kleinian theory, we know that immature development contributes to the fragilities and faultlines of masculinity as well as femininity. We can say this because Chodorow’s Achilles Complex is based on the myth of Achilles who is “a junior man” humiliated by the actions of a superior officer, Agamemnon. To recap Chodorow’s theory:

“The psychic fault lines of masculinity and male selfhood express two developmental and fantasy components: first, maleness as not-female, the male self as defensively separate from and warding off the other [mother/feminine], defensively needing to split self from other if hatred takes over [and this hated object is first psychically introduced to small child in early development as the maternal “Object Other”]; second, maleness as adult man rather than boy-child, not humiliated, shamed, or defeated by another man [forged originally in the father-son affair of Oedipal relations.] (Chodorow, 2012, pp. 135).” …. Furthermore,

“…. this developmental context, issues of selfhood [self-identity] as well as of gender [gender identity] tend to differentiate men from women, such that the male’s sense of self may typically be more defensive and in need of protecting its boundaries than the female’s typical sense of self. (Chodorow, 2012, p. 130).” ….

Additionally,

“Humiliation, specifically, is especially a male-male — originally father-son — affair. In the normal developmental course of events, much hinges on how a boy relates to his father and turns into a man — the delicate negotiation of this transformation, of identification, of how to replace or join without bringing on retaliation, castration, or humiliation. All of these, in turn, depend partly on a father’s own sense of confident masculinity and selfhood. … (Chodorow, 2012, pp. 131).”

Might the same be said of femininity and the female self originally configured in the mother-daughter relationship? And what’s more, how does humiliation play into the original mother-daughter affair? Indeed, it does and those outcomes will be discussed later.

To continue, we can certainly say that immature development (being a junior man/young man) bears a part in the fragilities and faultlines of masculinity because mature, intelligent men, possessing normal, healthy, and secure development seemed to be better suited in navigating humiliation as their secure sense of self forged in the original secure attachments of the father-son relationship as well as the mother-son relationship balance out the loss encountered and to which these men’s self-identity and gender identity are neither threatened by feelings of femininity/homophobia nor does it require them to make a display of their “sense of masculinity through physical prowess and physical power.” That is to say, these men feel secure in their self-identity, are intelligent to know better, that masculinity sometimes requires accepting losses and these realizations occur as a natural consequence through the natural course of development we call aging (Erikson, 1982). So while mature men encountering a loss, although the loss may feel uncomfortable and foreign even humiliating, possess a strong degree of healthy problem-solving creativity rooted in their secure sense of self, and seemed to be more accepting of ruptures because their experiences and possessed feelings of assuredness in their identity, knowing that this loss will not “define them as weak/powerless/feminine/non-masculine,” and knowing one must sometimes “try again” in order to overcome failures. This does not seem to happen with regard to the immature stages of human gender development and/or those possessing abnormal developmental attachments known as ambivalent attachmentavoidant attachment, and disorganized attachments, (Wallin, 2007) and high levels of narcissism requiring high degrees of narcissistic supply (wins over losses). This is not to say, that individuals possessing these attachment styles will go on to victimize others with serious or fatal violent aggression either. Its reference here is completely an indexical sign but not guaranteed in terms of future risk of perpetrating violence. Of course, something must be said regarding how these two faultlines of masculinity play into authoritarian types of personalities and dictatorships. As a result, women tend to be far less physically aggressive but tend to use much more social strategy and “game” with regard to their gameplay and utilize more passive-aggressive violence which contributes to their social intelligence. Whereas men, because of how they were socialized with regard to identifying with their father’s phallus as well as being taught what it means to be “a man”, tend to exert their identity more in terms of physical strength and male-patterned dominance which often is displayed as violence.

The Fragilities and Faultlines of Femininity

To begin, women, borrowing from Freudian psychology, tend to be much more masochistic as we witness higher rates of anorexia and bulimia among women as well as female rates of self-cutters in self-harming behaviors but also their desire for self-castration fantasies such as plastic surgeries (Knafo & Feiner, 2006). So, regarding “the fragilities and faultlines of femininity” one similar type of possessed psychoanalytic characteristics is immaturity which may be due to abnormal development, play into the psychological dynamic to serious and fatal violence and aggression against the gendered self. The traits Freud termed “peculiar” to femininity which he observed as “high degrees of possessed narcissism,” is a young egocentricity — a defensive need to “hold the male gaze”, may also play a role in the fragilities and faultlines of femininity. The key defining characteristic between the two, masculinity and femininity, is in the way the genders defend against loss. As a general rule, women already have to navigate the lost phallus at an early age, this fact seems to bear a part in how women also handle future losses. Women’s lost phallus becomes her “deficiency” and so, are socialized to be submissive to the phallus and from a very early age may introject the lost phallus as her “deficiency.” 

Women’s possessed sense of, and desire towards, aesthetic beauty may bear a part in the destabilization of her feminine identity as women tend toward possessing high degrees of vanity in combination with high impression management thereby contributing to the faultlines of her femininity. This peculiarity seems to be in line with the same type of immature development (egocentricity and defensive need to hold the male gaze) and/or abnormalities in developmental attachments to the mother-child affair as well as the father-child affair. This is to say, women tend toward fear in “becoming their mothers.” That is to say and to borrow from Nancy Chodorow, the first faultline of femininity is femaleness that is “not like Mother” in a defensive need to split the self from the Object Other if hatred takes over. When this happens, women experience castration fears of aging such as loss of aesthetic beauty, self-doubt and wondering about her own value, become completely foreclosed about becoming a mother herself, or feel threatened when placed against other powerful female Objects. When we witness this psychic defensive need of femininity displayed in women, what we witness is far lesser an aspect of masculine physical strength and prowess exerted against an Object Other. Although there has been crime statistics reported as this happening within a small population of women who kill, which has been eloquently termed “femme Fatales”what is more commonly observed is passive-aggressive violence occurring against Object Other (in a defensive need to split the self from the Other, internalized mother, if hated takes over). That is because this all-powerful Mother figure could feed and nurture us or abandon us and leave us to die. For some, these unconscious fears may remain to stay strong within the unconscious and may develop into borderline personality disorder (Silberschmidt, Lee, Zanarini, and Schulz, 2015).

Additionally, because this maternal object has been incorporated into the psyche and identified with as the maternal Object because of shared genitalia, women are more likely to exert violence against the self as opposed to the Other outside herself, as she herself possesses the Object Within in the triangulation of her psyche of Mother-Father Self (Holmes, 2008, Holmes, 2013). She can become psychotically foreclosed against any possibility of a heterosexual development and/or instead develop a homosexual or transgender lifestyle as a creative compromise to a problem as well as develop sexually deviant creative female perversions. “If a little girl has no penis to prove she is not her mother, she can introject the mother (Holmes, 2013).” In a similar vein, if a little girl has no penis to prove she is the father, she can introject the father’s phallus. Likewise, if a little boy has no vagina to prove he is like his mother, he can introject the mother’s vagina creatively through phantasy and/or fantasy (Knafo and Feiner, 2006).

When a little girl introjects their mother, the little girl is able to gain mastery over the maternal object which is both feared, loved, and hated. This psychoanalytic truth holds true for the little boys as well who introject the father through identifying with his penis. What we observe in cases of humiliation forged in the original mother-daughter affair, and I am going to theorize here based on my readings, as is the development of homosexuality (lesbian, and transgender homosexuality, anorexia-bulimia, the development of feminine machisma, and the idealized phallus, and other forms of violence against the self; such as excessive body manipulations and plastic surgeries, abortions, and other self-defeating behaviors such as excessive promiscuity and using the body as a prop “sex object” as a defensive need, as well as the ultimate denial, suicide, in the formation of abnormal identity and object relations.

If we consider Freud’s phrase, “anatomy as destiny,” we can accept the following: “We all, men and women, have an unconscious impulse to control and subordinate the female sex, and this is because our first object in this world is a powerful woman who can feed us or let us die. We all, men and women, have to find our own ways to subdue and contain this loved and hated figure, and boys and girls find different solutions to this universal problem (Holmes, 2013).”

We can now borrow from the writings of Julia Kristeva who wrote in her “Stabat Mater:”

“When feminists call for a new representation of femininity, they seem to identify maternity with this idealized misapprehension: and feminism, because it rejects the image and its abuses, sidesteps, the real experience that this fantasy obscures. As a result, maternity is repudiated or denied by some avant-garde feminists, while its traditional representations are wittingly or unwittingly accepted by the “broad mass” of women and men.”

Lesbian Homosexuality and Forms of BDSM in Deviant Sexual Relationships (fetishes)

To expound further on the fragilities and faultlines of feminity we look to the writings of Simone de Beauvoir who said all the complexities of feminity can be explained through the fact, that in this world, women function as a “deficient Other” (de Beauvoir, 1952). I interpret this quote as implying that a woman is perceived as a deficient Other when she is without a masculine counterpart (a husband) with which to complete and guide her in the world. This implies there is not only a need for a healthy connection to what women experience as “femininity” but also a need for protecting its integrity for all forms of socially acceptable femininity (homosexual, transgender, masculine dominant female, and otherwise). This requirement may move us toward a healthier understanding of the differences in object relations, with regard to femininity, with an importance placed on issues surrounding boundaries and mergings and what those “boundaries” and “mergings” mean for a properly socialized acceptable feminine identity. Speaking from personal experience, the female creative perversion I have developed as a way to unconsciously control and subordinate the female sex manifests as homosexual phantasies. I believe this is my unconscious impulse to control and subordinate female flesh. In all sibling arrangements and childhood relationships there exists this unconscious impulse or wish to control and subordinate the female sex. The question is whether or not the individual will be successful in satisfying their potential defensive need to control and subordinate this “Object Other” without harming the object of her affections.

Nancy Chodorow wrote French psychoanalysis through Lacan and structuralism argued that gender and sexuality are always in the partial realm of culture. “Our bodies, masculinity, and femininity are named linguistically. Our identities, fantasies, and desires are filtered through our parents’ own linguistically infused fantasies, through cultural stories, and through institutions like marriage, parenthood, religion, and politics … When we come up against these findings that each clinically particular individual has his or her own personally individualized sexuality, whose description requires much more than a generalization about the sex of the object in relation to the self (Chodorow, 2012, pp.155–156).”

In the above statement, we get a good dose of caution from Chodorow alerting us to generalizations about sexuality. This information contained herein this post is meant to be taken as informative information gleaned from accredited psychoanalysts and philosophers.

In another form of sexual deviance, we witness this unconscious impulse to subordinate the female sex through something called Bondage and Discipline in Sadism and Masochism (BDSM). This form of sexual deviance allows for the very real potential for “binding female flesh with props.” These props can be used by the subjects as counterphobic defensives (counterphobic objects) that help us to navigate, defend, and ward off our anxieties surrounding our defensive impulses to control and subordinate female flesh as well as to be subordinated by. The element of consent is a crucial aspect of this type of sexual deviance. These props, leather straps, ropes, chains, other medieval restraining devices as well as electronic stimulation toys (eStim) may be used in counter defensive to the powerful unconscious wish to control our early childhood Objects (mother/father). More recently there has been concern over newly developing technologies used for electronic stimulation (eStim toys) and service security surveillance technologies in pursuit of “potential threats” to the security, prosperity, and freedom of American democracy. Christine Weiland wrote, Culture, as a space where the working through of fundamental human problems takes place, constitutes a container; culture, as an ideal and a prohibition, constitutes part of the superego. For the individual, the solution to any particular psychic problem will depend on both his/her object relations as well as the cultural space.” She also expressed fears towards advancing new technological inventions which would place matricidal destructiveness in the hands of people possessing infantile anxieties. In “Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals,” Carol Cohn had lucidly demonstrated in her writing the lethal aspects that result from the social embodiment of, or the acting out, of unanalyzed phantasies belonging to the male imaginary (Wieland, 1996; Jacobs, 2007; Kohn, 1987).” How does this play into the fragilities and faultlines of femininity? It bears importance when consider against the psychoanalytic backdrop of triangulation Lucy Holmes wrote about and witnessed in her clinical patients. That is the Mother-Father-Self psychic triangulation. And how this triangulation of not only mother-daughter, but the father-daughter affair, may influence infantile anxieties where the phallus becomes the counterphobic defense against the feared all-powerful mother in the development of female masculinities of “machisma” as well as other feminine peculiarities.

Anorexia and Bulimia

Little boys are given the ability to separate themselves psychically from their mothers’ deficiency by misidentifying with her. That is to say since little boys have a penis and so they identify with the father’s all-powerful penis. The traditional Freudian psychology places the mother as the “deficient Other” or the weak and powerless parental object. However, little girls don’t have this option and so they identify with this powerful maternal figure through her “milk” (breasts also theorized as the maternal penis). Helene Cixous claimed the mother is a metaphor. She also wrote the breast acts as a privileged topos of female expression: “a woman is never far from ‘mother’ . . . There is always within her at least a little of that good mother’s milk. She writes in white ink.” And so, we come to understand, “Mother writes in white ink; mother’s milk.” And so, “Voice: milk that could go on forever … Eternity: is voice mixed with milk (Walker, 1998, pp. 134–139).” We can make a comparison by saying, at least for the little boy, the penis is the privileged topos of masculine expression. In like vein, the little boy is never far from his ‘father.’ But to further theorize, for a little girl who finds her mother frustrating and humiliating towards her, the powerful milk association, identification, and incorporation of “mommy is now inside of me because I drank her milk” becomes the powerful abdication of the “Queen” through reverse digestion, the regurgitation of that frustrating milk through forced expulsion of food or the complete denial of it (food) as the psychic defensive needed to split the self from this hated body, yet incorporated, still humiliating and frustrating internalized object. If homosexuality is a compromised formation, then we could also say too, anorexia and bulimia may also be a form of creative compromised solution, albeit potentially lethal and dangerous. If we turn to Julia Kristeva, she views maternity as “the privileged realm of the subject’s ambiguous stance between the sensuous pre-Oedipal bonds of maternal attachment and the disciplined separation of Oedipal (or symbolic) detachment. The mother’s body is the lived terrain of this contradiction, serving as both source of a disruptive semiotic and as pre-condition for the productive symbolic. She reproduces the father’s symbolic order while simultaneously destroying it with her pre-symbolic links to the disruptive realm of (unrestrained) libidinal drives (Walker, 1998, pp. 145–146; Oliver, 1993, pp. 3).”

The influencing semiotics of language found in the maternal chora, a negative language spoken that marks the return of the symbolic order. “It is the site that constantly subverts the stability and coherence of the symbolic. It appears to be at odds with the paternal authority of the symbolic (Walker, 1998, pp. 115; Kristeva, 1985).” For Kristeva, the semiotics is linguistics tied to the body and expressed as a “bodily experience,” such that for the child this time period exists before the time of acquired spoken language (pre-Oedipal) and so, its subjective influences remain hidden in the unconscious. Here Michelle Boulous Walker reports feminist writers suggesting the maternal body as “the body as negativity” and “embodies an active form of madness.” “This madness erupts as laughter indicating aggressive negativity toward unity and law (Walker, 1998, pp. 115; Kristeva, 1985). The language of the body is experienced in very real negative and positive ways by the child. Thus, again, unwittingly sets up for us a scenario of the borderline patient (Silberschmidt, Lee, Zanarini, and Schulz, 2015). Thus, similar to how Chodorow interprets the masculine development of a child;

“In the normal developmental course of events, much hinges on how a boy relates to his father and turns into a man — the delicate negotiation of this transformation, of identification, of how to replace or join without bringing on retaliation, castration, or humiliation. All of these, in turn, depend partly on a father’s own sense of confident masculinity and selfhood (Chodorow, 2012, pp. 131).”

So too, can we surmise that “much hinges on how a daughter relates to her mother and thus develops into a woman. In a similar arrangement, the delicate negotiation of this transformation, of identification, of how to replace or join in without bringing on retaliation, castration, or humiliation. All of these, in turn, depend partly on the mother’s own sense of confident femininity and selfhood.”

In a similar vein, Weiland tells us all patients, in fact all people, are in some way engaged in an internal struggle with their objects, especially the mother. Although this struggle is unique to the person as it is hidden for someopen for others, it seems to underlie the human condition and, in this sense, constitutes a fundamental human problem where the solution to it is both an individual and cultural one (Weiland, 1996).

And as Carol Cohn informs us of the lethal cultural results when the social embodiment of the male imaginary (the phallus) is allowed to parade in unrestrained fashion with no prohibitions placed on the part of the superego what we witness is infantile destructiveness in an age of advancing, available to the highest bidder, technology.

Feminine Machisma and the Idealized Phallus and Fear of Pregnancy

I will briefly discuss these faultlines of femininity; feminine machisma, the idealized phallus, and fear of pregnancy. It has been theorized the father’s penis becomes the idealized symbolic imaginary for little girls and is “every girl’s solution” to navigating her loss of not being given a penis. Where I do not necessarily believe this to be a “faultline” per se, as one must consider one’s object choices placed in substitution for the lost phallus. For example, female love object choice in lesbian homosexuality and choosing a masculine gender identity, pursuing a career as a female military officer, or becoming a pilot as an idealized form of phallus substitution. Also, professional female athletes, female police officers, and female bodybuilders may utilize healthy avenues to satisfy their lost phallus and I often think of Serena Williams and her tennis racket as phallus. While others may develop unhealthy behaviors like becoming female gang members to prove their worth in criminalized organized crime groups, in demonstrations of physical violence of their possessed masculine strength, prowess, and power. We might inquire, “Are we all “hard-wired” and “cemented” to our object choices based on our genetics and cultural upbringings?” Consider reading the journal article written by David Berreby, “The Things That Divide Us.” We know from the psychoanalytics of identity formation, culture is a very strong influencing factor. In addition, some women have very real unconscious fears of maternity and may require several years of psychotherapy before becoming pregnant (Balsam, 2012; Jacobs, 2007). This is not necessarily a faultline, in my opinion, although it can pose a problem for women wishing to become pregnant. The choice of maternity is a personal and private one. In addition, our unconscious fantasies and defensive impulses in relation to our objects, we all have been informed by our parental influences both maternal and paternal, their marital arrangements, the quality of their marriage and treatment of one another, and cultural surroundings which all play a bearing on a child’s future identity.

These are just a few of the ways females deal with the unconscious impulse to control and subordinate the female flesh. I have not discussed excessive body manipulations and self-castration fantasies nor acts of excessive promiscuity and the most fatal of all unconscious drives, suicide.

SOURCES:

Balsam, Rosemary. (2012). Women’s Bodies in Psychoanalysis. East Essex, Canada. Routledge.

Berreby, David. “The Things That Divide Us”. National Geographic Magazine. April 2018. Vol. 233, №4. pp.46–67. “We are wired at birth to tell Us from Them and to favor our own group.”

Chasseguet-Smirgel, Janine. (1984). Creativity and Perversion. London. Free Association Books.

Chodorow, Nancy J. (2012). Individualizing Gender and Sexuality: Theory and Practice. Relational Books Perspective, Volume 53. New York. Routledge; Taylor & Francis Group.

Cohn, Carol. Sex and Death in the Relational World of Defense Intellectuals. Signs: Women, Gender, and Theory. Vol. 12, №4. Summer, 1987. pp. 687–718.

de Beauvoir, S. (1952). The Second Sex. New York. Alfred A. Knopf.

Erikson, Eric H. (1982). The Life Cycle Completed. New York. Norton.

Freud, S. (1909). Analysis of a Phobia in a Five-year-old boy (Little Hans). In Standard Edition, Volume 10. pp 5–149. London. Hogarth Press.

_______, S. (1924). The dissolution of the Oedipus complex. In Standard Edition, Vol. 7.

_______, S (1931). Female Sexuality. In Standard Edition, Volume 21.

Holmes, Lucy. (2008). The Internal Triangle: New theories in female development. New York. Jason Aronson.

Holmes, Lucy. (2013). Wrestling with Destiny: The Promise of Psychoanalysis. New York. Routledge.

Jacobs, Amber. (2007). On Matricide: Myth, Psychoanalysis, and the Law of the Mother. New York. Columbia University Press. Chapter 12, The Latent Mother-Daughter (pp. 148–156).

Knafo, Danielle and Feiner, Kenneth (2006). Unconscious Fantasies and the Relational World. Hillside, NJ. The Analytic Press, Inc.

Kristeva, Julia (1986). Stabat Mater. In Female Body in Western Culture: Contemporary Perspectives. Cambridge, MA. Harvard University Press.

Kristeva, Julia (1985). Revolution in Poetic Language. New York. Columbia University Press.

Oliver, Kelly. (1993). Reading Kristeva: Unraveling the double-bind. Bloomington. Indiana University Press.

Silberschmidt, Amy; Lee, Susanne, PhD; Zanarini, MD; and Schulz, Charles S., MD. Gender Differences in Borderline Personality Disorder: Results from a multinational clinical trial sample. Journal of Personality Disorders. Vol. 29, No. 6 (December, 2015). Note: Gender differences in BPD populations tend to be comprised of women at a rate of 75% or higher. 

Walker, Michelle Boulous. (1998). Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading silence. New York. Routledge.

Wallin, David J. (2007) Attachment in Psychotherapy. New York. Guilford Press. 

Wieland, C. (1996). Matricide and Destructiveness: Infantile Anxieties and Technological Culture. British Journal of Psychotherapy, 12(3),

OTHER BLOG POSTS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS CONTENT:

Barna, Karen. The Fragilities and Faultlines of Masculinity. ProclivitysPrincipleWisdom.Medium.com. Published online January 3, 2020. https://proclivitysprinciplewisdom.medium.com/the-fragilities-and-fault-lines-of-masculinity-87b85babef49

Barna, Karen. Myth, Phantasy, and Culture: Male counterphobic defenses against emasculation. ProclivitysPrincipleWisdom.Medium.com. Published online May 11, 2021. https://proclivitysprinciplewisdom.medium.com/myth-phantasy-and-culture-male-counterphobic-defenses-against-emasculation-3099b2bdf3d7

Barna, Karen. On Why The Creation Of Aestheticism Is So Important To Self Esteem and To Falsehood. ProclivitysPrincipleWisdom.Medium.com. Published August 10, 2021. https://proclivitysprinciplewisdom.medium.com/on-why-the-creation-of-aestheticism-is-so-important-to-self-esteem-and-to-falsehood-4c42b10c0fdf

Barna, Karen. Freud’s Riddle of Femininity and Some of the Secret Peculiarities of Female Psychopathologies. ProclivitysPrincipleWisdom.Medium.com. Published September 16, 2021. https://proclivitysprinciplewisdom.medium.com/freuds-riddle-of-femininity-and-some-of-the-secret-peculiarities-of-female-psychopathologies-79b8620833b1

Barna, Karen. The Riddle of Gang (Group) Stalking and Uncovering some its “Secret Peculiarities”: A forensic analysis of one individual case study. ProclivitiysPrincipleWisdom.Medium.com. Published September, 18, 2021. The importance of this post works through some of the psychoanalytic of gendered-based aggression/violence.  The Riddle of Group (Gang) Stalking and Uncovering Some of its “Secret Peculiarities”: A forensic analysis of one individual case study | by Karen Barna | Sep, 2021 | Medium 

Social Myths and Perspecticide: How they work together

Illustration by Tracy J. Lee.

In the September 2021 issue of National Geographic Magazine “Mysteries of the Solar System,” on page 7 you’ll find a section entitled PROOF, “Collars of Conviction.” It is a seven-page section dedicated to the collars of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Embroidered on one of the famous collars she wore is a quote from Ginsburg’s husband, “It’s not sacrifice, it’s family.” Symbolically sewn with four layers of nicely sewn fabric, it is imbued with personal meaning. Each layer represents a member of her immediate family (Natasha Daly; 2021).

One of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s famous collars.

Ginsburg became professionally involved in gender equality in 1970 and began defending women’s rights. Her identity reflects that of woman, wife, mother, Jewish daughter of immigrants, second woman on the high court, not only balancing out the perspectives of the Supreme Court but an icon for all women balancing out so many different roles women have become accustomed to struggling with.

Yet my brother-in-law seems to think Ruth Bader Ginsburg by riding out her career on the Supreme Court, in the face of unbeatable cancer, somehow “screwed us all.” In his opinion, she “screwed us” because she refused to step down in the face of an unbeatable obstacle and instead choose to continue her duties as Supreme Court justice thereby allowing Donald Trump the right to choose her next replacement. I guess she should of just “sulked away like the wounded gal she was and just have given up.” But Ruth Bader Ginsburg would have never given up her post so easily. Yet, my brother-in-law insists that by not withdrawing Ginsburg allowed Donald Trump, and thereby the Republican party, further leverage on the Supreme Court with his replacement of Amy Coney Barrett. In my opinion, my brother-in-law’s belief is what is known as a social myth. The core of this social myth places at the center a female object for which we are to blame for male patriarchy’s Senate Republican majority action.

I like to contrast the sexual difference against the backdrop of racial difference. On the page opposite the story of “Collars of Conviction” resides “The Story of Human Difference” which asks the question, “If race is a social construct, not a biological trait, why do so many people still doubt it?” To provide a little background example, during the mid 1800s, I would say around the 1850s, a doctor by the name of Dr. Marion Simms practiced gynecology and obstetrics. He has been called the father of modern gynecological/obstetric medicine. Dr. Simms research employed the use of black female slaves as test subjects. Dr. Marion Simms believed in the social myth, “Black people have a higher tolerance for pain.” It is for this reason, Dr. Marion Simms performed experimental surgery on black female slaves without the use of any anesthesia or pain medication (Perper & Cina, 2010).

A 2016 research study conducted by the University of Virginia found that half of 200 medical students, who were used in their study, held at least one belief about “biological difference between blacks and whites, many of which are false and fantastical in nature.” They included myths like black people have higher tolerances for pain and their skin is thicker than whites due to biological (genetic) differences (Samarrai, 2016; Saini, 2021). These beliefs, of course, are myths. Just like the myth “Ruth Bader Ginsburg screwed us all.”

The myth that “Ruth Bader Ginsburg screwed us” due to her refused to step down from the bench while Barrack Obama was in office, thereby “giving Obama a better chance at choosing a more suitable replaced” is a myth because Ruth Bader Ginsburg was in her full-right to decide not to step down, and furthermore, even if she did step down, that was no guarantee the Republican-controlled Senate would have allowed Obama to replace her when they placed a refusal on Merrick Garland. Her decision not to step down is a given right extended to all Supreme Court justices if they so choose to remain active and forgo retirement. In my opinion, my brother-in-law’s misguided belief represents unconscious wishes towards strong women who have been endowed with the privilege to make their own forthright decisions. His opinion is nothing more than a myth, not founded in Truth but rather eclipsing Truth by attempting to gather support from unsuspecting non-thinkers who might choose to agree with his unfounded beliefs without perusal of the facts.

In addition, our Republican leaders, at the time, dismissed Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s wish that a new justice not be appointed until a new president was installed. Instead, there was a mad rush to install a new justice, by the then existing presidential administration of Donald Trump. And in the face of the unprecedented refusal of the Senate majority to consider the nomination of Merrick Garland by then-president Barack Obama, a Democrat, for 293 days (the longest day by far) is a clear and present statement made by male Republican majority leaders. Barrack Obama’s nomination expired on January 3, 2017, at the end of the 114th Congress and eventually, then President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated and appointed Neil Gorsuch. One of the most unjustified miscarriages of leadership ever witnessed thus far by those in Washington, D.C. This was clearly an attempt to keep the Supreme Court predominately ruled and powered by Republican political nominees. However, nominations and elections of the Supreme Court, district, circuit, D.C. circuit, and Supreme Court, just about balance out (Elving, 2018; Drum, 2020).

Myths Still Linger

No matter how hard we may try, social myths still linger and continue to pervade social thinking. Myths like, “If a woman walks into a bar alone, she deserves to be raped.” Or other myths like, “If people want to practice stupidity they deserved to get beaten.” Myths like, “Black people have high pain tolerances because they are genetically different than whites” and “certain ethnic groups are more susceptible to COVID-19 because of biological and genetic differences that make them more prone to the infection.” In one of the world’s leading medical journals, the Lancet, in May 2020, insisted that “genetic make-up could be a possible factor in varying COVID-19 outcomes seen among ethnic groups at the time.” This strain of thinking has endured across the centuries and, when in 1793 a yellow fever outbreak occurred in Philadelphia, it was believed by white physicians that black people were immune to the yellow fever infection (Saini, 2021).

Social Myths in Action and How They Function

Myths attempt to downplay the actions taken by those guilty of prejudicial beliefs. Myths attempt to validate false beliefs that exonerate the guilty parties and vilify the innocent. Hence, “it was Ruth Bader Ginsburg that screwed us all” and not the Republican Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell. Myths attempt to focus on aspects of the innocent. For example, the fact a girl was drinking, or the refusal of Ruth Bader Ginsberg to step down while terminally ill with cancer, or that blacks are resistant to or more susceptible to certain types of infection without any scientific proof. The social myth then vilifies the innocent by focusing on the one “bad action” taken by the victim. The victim walked alone. The victim was drinking alcohol and got drunk. The victim refused to step down. The victim was a black man walking in the shadows. The victim was a prostitute. These statements are all forms of attempts at perspecticide and awareness campaigns need to be created to ensure those who are guilty are not exonerated by false social myths surrounding prejudice. Hence, the statement said about a high school boy, guilty as a member of gang raping an unconscious girl, at a party, “He is a good boy. He could have never committed rape. The girl shouldn’t have been drinking so much” (Kosloski, Diamond-Welch, and Mann; 2018). We need to have conversations about social myths and the role they play in forms of percpecticides, that is the usurpation of free-thinking, and attempts at coercively controlling others by implanting false social beliefs. When this is done, perpetrators unwittingly usurp power away from the innocent and place that power in the hands of the guilty, thereby exonerating the perpetrators of any and all wrongdoing. “She’s “crazy,” and so, the line of logical thinking goes she deserves to be beaten, raped, murdered, or whatever the case may be.

Research has indicated the impact of social myths on victims and how perspecticide negatively effects free-thinking by implanting not only false beliefs about women, but different ethnic groups, and those with difference in sexual orientation, those marginalized by the higher social order, have implied that coercive control, like sexual coercion, can negatively effect performance and mental health (Stermac, Bance, Cripps, Horowits, 2018; Stark, 2007) and effect the discourse and action taken against those in possession of difference.

Sources are listed in order as they appear cited in the paper:

Natasha Daly. Mysteries of the Solar System. National Geographic Magazine. Vol. 240, №3, September 2021. PROOF “Collars of Conviction” (pg. 7–14).

Joshua A. Perper & Stephen J. Cina. (2010). When Doctors Kill: Who, Why, and How. New York. Copernicus Books.

Fariss Samarrai. Study Links Disparities in Pain Management to Racial Bias. UVA Today. Published online April 4, 2016. https://news.virginia.edu/content/study-links-disparities-pain-management-racial-bias

Angela Saini. Mysteries of the Solar System. National Geographic Magazine. Vol. 240, №3, September 2021. EXPLORE “The Story of Human Difference” (pg. 15–18).

Ron Elving. What Happened With Merrick Garland In 2016 and Why It Matters Now. NPR News. Published online June 29, 2018. https://www.npr.org/2018/06/29/624467256/what-happened-with-merrick-garland-in-2016-and-why-it-matters-now

Kevin Drum. Fact of the Day: Democrats and Republicans Have Appointed the Same Number of Judges. Mother Jones. Published September 23, 2020. Retrieved online August 28, 2021. https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2020/09/fact-of-the-day-democrats-and-republicans-have-appointed-the-same-number-of-judges/

Anna E. Kosloski, Bridget K. Diamond-Welch, and Olivia Mann. The Presence of Rape Myths in the Virtual World: A Qualitative Textual Analysis of the Steubenville Sexual Assault Case. Violence and Gender. Vol. 5, №3. Published online October 5, 2018.

Lana Stermac, Sheena Bance, Jenna Cripps, Sarah Horowits. Sexual Coercion and Women’s Education: A Pilot Study. Violence and Gender. Vol. 5, №2. Published online June 1, 2018.

Stark, Evan. (2007). Coercive Control: The entrapment of women in everyday life. New York. Oxford University Press.

Other sources to consider reading regarding feminism, domination, and sadism but not cited in the writing:

Benjamin, J. (1988). The Bonds of Love: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and the Problem with Domination. New York. Pantheon Books.

Butler, Judith. (2021). The Force of Non-Violence: An ethico-political bind. New York. Verso Publishing.

Brian Van Brunt, Amy Murphy, Lisa Pescara-Kovach, and Gina-Lyn Crance. Early Identification of Grooming and Targeting in Predatory Sexual Behavior on College Campuses. Violence and Gender. Vol. 6, №1. Published online March 11, 2019

Chodorow, Nancy J. (2012). Individualizing Gender and Sexuality: Theory and Practice. Relational Books Perspective, Volume 53. New York. Routledge; Taylor & Francis Group.

Douglas, H., Harris, B.A., & Dragiewicz, .M. (2019). Technology-facilitated Domestic and Family Violence: Women’s Experiences. The British Journal of Criminology, 59(3).

Holmes, Lucy. (2013). Wrestling with Destiny: The Promise of Psychoanalysis. New York. Routledge.

Johnson, L., Plouffe, R., & Saklofske, D. (2019). Subclinical Sadism and the Dark Triad. Journal of Individual Differences, 40(3), 127–133.

Knafo, Danielle & Feiner Kenneth. (2006). Unconscious Fantasies and the Relational World. Relational Perspective Book Series, Volume 31. Hillside, NJ. The Analytic Press, Inc.

Krick, A., Tresp, S., Vatter, M., Ludwig, A., Wihlenda, M., & Rettenberger, M. (2016). The Relationships Between the Dark Triad, the Moral Judgment Level, and the Students’ Disciplinary Choice. Journal of Individual Differences, 37(1), 24–30.

Plaza, M. (2008). Ideology against women. Gender Issues, 4(1), 73–82.

Wieland, C. (1996). Matricide and Destructiveness: Infantile Anxieties and Technological Culture. British Journal of Psychotherapy, 12(3),

Philosophical Debate On The Biopower of Electronically Targeted, Psychotronic Torture, and Treatments In Addiction

Part of the use of wireless technology in hospitals is the use of an electromagnetic frequency waves that affect brain signals by “dumbing down” the patients and turning them further into malleable vegetables for disposal. The hospital that uses this type of technology is a brain trauma hospital in Trenton, New Jersey known as Capital Health Systems at Fuld. They also have a psychiatric ward that addresses multiple diagnosis. Not all hospitals do.

I am going to attempt to illustrate the pervasive difference in the philosophical logic behind biopower. My point is to prove how traditional political appearances play into what we perceive as “sickness.”

What is the difference between a woman who has persistently battle with re-occurring forms of cancer, who, in her moment of desperation, ends her life because she sees her life as a form of drudgery and angst against a monster she can’t fight? And the woman who, using alcohol or drugs, uses persistently to battle the in-equality that has been set before in re-occurring forms of abuse and neglect uses these substances to help her better “bear her cross.”

This sets up a somewhat complimentary order of “sickness” in the philosophical positions to decide whose life is more “valuable” and whose life is “not valuable.” Now, for the sake of all fairness, philosophically speaking both lives are valuable as each life holds their own hopes, dreams, desires, and loves, and, furthermore, these women are “valuable” to those who love these women. But to those who do not love them, their lives are merely just “other lives.”

Some might take the position that the woman battling re-occurring forms of cancer is in her right to take her own life because of the pain and suffering of the disease. That she is entitled to “death with dignity.” Yet, the woman who uses drugs and alcohol persistently may be perceived as “less deserving.” Why? Is it because I placed a woman in this philosophical discussion and not a man? Is it because it is most likely to be a “younger woman” using as time affects rates of recovery and this makes her more likely to be a promiscuous female? Is it because promiscuous females are perceived as “prostitutes?” This is where I feel, as both a philosopher and a woman, the bias begins. That is, with the perception of “prostitute.” Is it because I also used the term woman in the cancer schema and this sends even the slightest perception that it is more likely a middle-aged, mother, as these women are most likely to be battling re-occurring forms of cancer? Or, perhaps the cancer patient is an elderly female who has lived a wholesome and fruitful life because cancer is more likely to strike the middle-aged and elderly populations as time is a factor when it comes to lifestyle behaviors. One might ask the question, “Did the cancer patient smoke?” How does that lifestyle behavior affect perceptions? Does this make it possible these populations of women are more deserving of “rights” over less aged populations? Or is it because the younger woman has more time attached to her life with more possibilities for successful outcomes, and THAT possibility makes her life worth saving even more so?

“Time washes everything clean. Don’t it now.” ~Sheryl Crow, Riverwide

I have observed the philosophical tenants against young women and many substances abusing young women are, not only perceived as “prostitutes,” but actually are by occupation. I also believe there is a stereotypical bias against these two types in people who have never had either phenomenon touch their personal lives. That is, knowing someone with addiction or the disease cancer.

In order to have an adequate debate, each of the above-answered questions must be argued. Of course, I didn’t outline the level of addiction in the “addicted woman schema.” So, to be clear, I want to address the level of addiction as this:

“Addicted Woman Schema”

The woman uses every day, but mostly after work hours, and has suffered long-term sexual, physical, and emotional abuse by her loved ones. There are times this woman drinks to excess which sends “red flags” to healthcare workers regarding her “problem.” As if what she has been going through hasn’t already been “intense.” In addition, this woman has been claiming she is being “managed” by a biopower politic that might involve the healthcare industry which she claims has forced her to use smaller quantities of drugs and alcohol every day. But it appears because of her past history of use, it may be someone whom she knows or is surrounding her in her environment. The healthcare professionals have labeled her “schizophrenic” and point out she needs to “call the police.” The woman has stated that she has contacted the police but because of the invisibility of the assaults, it makes it impossible to adequately ascertain the guilty party.

“The Cancer Patient Schema”

The woman who has battled re-occurring forms of cancer simply does not want to go through another round of chemotherapy. It’s draining and fatiguing and the process is beginning to wear her down. She first battled breast cancer at 61 years of age. She then battled thyroid cancer at 69. She is now battling re-occurring forms of skin cancer now at stage four. She’s 79 years old.

Both women have undergone systematic punitive assaults, just in different ways. Both judges handing down sentences are silent, invisible, and tenacious.

Now, my entire point in this whole philosophical discussion which I am not adequately addressing because I’m not going to answer each posited point, point for point, is this. Mentally ill people have historically been seen as “less deserving” and “unvaluable.” Their lives have been frequently deemed “unlivable.” Yet, this position furthers the original causes of the disease and why these people use in the first place. They were part of a precarious and abandoned population. A song to consider is printed below regarding abandoned love which the healthcare industry is trying to make up for through the deployment of electronic targeted physical assaults. They not only use this technology on their psychic patients while they’re in the “holding area” where their future fate is to be decided but also when these people walk around in public; at the grocery store, at the libraries, at other public locations. I ask, “Is the healthcare industry safe for psychiatric patients?” HELL NO!

RIVERWIDE by Sheryl Crow

I spent a year in the mouth of a whale with a flame and a book of signs

You’ll never know how hard I’ve failed trying to make up for lost time

Once I believed in things unseen I was blinded by the dark

Out of the multitude to me he came and broke my heart

When the dash in the field has flown

And the youngest of hearts has grown

And you doubt you will ever be free

Honey, don’t bail on me

River is wide and oh so deep and it winds and winds around

I dream we’re happy in my sleep, floating down and down and down

And the tide rushes by where we stand

And the earth underneath turns to sand

And we’re waiting for someone to see

Honey, don’t bail on me

Tell Ma I loved a man even though I turned and ran

Lovely and fine, I could’ve been, laying down in the palm of his hand

Laying down in the palm of his hand

Laying down in the palm of his hand

Staying down in the palm of his hand

In the morning you wait for the sun

And secretly hope it won’t come

But time washes everything clean

Honey, now don’t bail on me

Don’t bail on me

No, don’t bail on me

Ooh?

My thesis is this. Electronic targeted physical assaults and psychotronic torture force a person to “lay down in the palm of man’s hand, staying down in the palm of his hand.” It can be analyzed by theories in subjection and subjugation by both Nietzsche, Hegel, Butler, and Foucault. As a woman, I find its deployment not only offensive but abusive because this phenomenon stipulates sentences and punishes without trial or jury those who are deemed as possessing “unvaluable lives” and possess “unlivable lives” by an abusive judge reigning over them. These schemas usually involve some loss of money and finances as part of the conspiracy.

Defining and Identifying Victim Blaming

Why is victim blaming so common in today’s society?

“Why do people try and explain their abuse which places focus on the person with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)/Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD), ie: the abuser, instead of the victim ending the abuse by ending the relationship?”

The above statement is an attempt to gaslight and devalue a victim’s right to explore and understand the reasons for their loved one’s mental illness by shifting the focus away from the mentally ill person and attempting to place blame and shame on the victim. Politicians know this as “spin“. (1) This type of language in discourse is myth-making language and is similar to rape myths found in cultures of deviance.

Research investigations into cases of sexual assault (rape) have uncovered the existence of dominant narratives supporting myths found in rape culture. These dominant narratives are prejudicial, stereotyped, false beliefs about rape, rape victims, and the rapists. These dominant narratives are widely believed and persistently held and are completely false.

Perspectiside

Perspectiside has been defined as the inability to know what you already know through gaslighting techniques of the abuser/narcissist. (2) This technique can be subtle or blatantly obvious to notice, but it involves getting the victim to question what they already know to be true. It creates confusion and disorientation by casting doubt in the minds of the victim and onlookers. For example, in the Steubenville rape case which occurred on August 11, 2012, students believed the girl who was gang-raped by members of the football team was responsible for her own rape because she got drunk and passed out. Not only was this girl gang-raped, but the men who raped her, urinated all over her after they were done. (3) The myth narratives which surfaced over certain students’ social media accounts consisted of phrases like, “If you don’t want to get raped, don’t get sloppy drunk homegirl.” Statements such as these are part of gaslighting techniques that seek to alleviate responsibility from those responsible and cast blame on to the victim in something that is also known as victim-blaming.

To understand its deleterious effects, let’s compare them to the historical event that sparked the massive hangings of “witches” in Salem, Massachusetts known as the Salem witch trials. (4) The cause of the Salem witch trials took root in the economic loss of one priest’s monthly stipend and the manifestation of a young 16-year-old girl’s, Elizabeth Knapp, bizarre symptoms which today have been posthumously diagnosed as belonging to hysteria. The psychological effects of growing up in an atmosphere of religious repression were harsh. To quote the book, A Delusion of Satan: The full story of the Salem witch trials:

“Terror and shame were used to encourage conformity even in the youngest. It was made clear to small children that they, were in as much danger of hellfire as adults. They were reminded that, however young they were, they might sicken and die at any time. The thoughtful ones agonized incessantly over the state of their consciences.”

In the Devaluation Phase of the narcissist, dominant myth narratives may be utilized by the abuser to procure conformity and act upon the consciousness of her behavior. (5) For example, a woman attempting to educate herself about her mentally ill husband might be greeted with a phrase like, “If you want to “educate” yourself why don’t you go into the basement and educate yourself about the plumbing problem?” This is an attempt to devalue the victim’s attempts at academic learning and bolster the worth of the plumber. It is a very common approach utilized by narcissists time and time again. It is a result of splitting, that is the splitting of Objects into “good” and “bad” parts belonging to the paranoid-schizoid position. (6)

When we compare this to the dominant narratives within the Steubenville rape case, dominant narratives that seek to alleviate the responsibility of the rapists and place blame on the actions of the victim, we can see striking similarities between the two (rapists/narcissistic abuser) dominant narratives. To read further about the Steubenville rape case click the link below:

Note: Post was previously published on https://www.proclivitiesprinciplewisdom.wordpress.com on October 15, 2020 by Karen Barna.

Sources:

(1) The History Channel. America’s Book of Secrets: Special Edition. S1, E1. White House Secrets and Scandals. Aired on August 11, 2020.

(2) Evan Stark. (2007) Coercive Control: The entrapment of women in personal life. New York. Oxford University Press. pp. 267–269.

(3) Kosloski, Anna E.; Diamond-Welch, Bridget K. (Ph.D.); Mann, Olivia (Ph.D.), The Presence of Rape Myths in the Virtual World: A Qualitative Textual Analysis of the Steubenville Sexual Assault Case. Violence and Gender. Vol. 5, №3 (published online October 5, 2018)

(4) Frances Hill. (1995) A Delusion of Satan: The full story of the Salem witch trials. Boston, Massachusetts. Da Capo Press.

(5) Judith Butler. (1997) The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in subjection. Stanford, California. Stanford University Press.

(6) Amber Jacobs. (2007) On Matricide: Myth, psychoanalysis, and the law of the mother. New York. Columbia University Press. pp.77–79.

The Proximate Cause and Effect of Outcomes Known as Distal Effect and How This May Help Explain Electronic Targeted Assaults

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An image of a diagram that describes the distal effects of pollution at the community level.

This story was originally published on May 11, 2019 over www.ProclivitiesPrincipleWisdom.wordpress.com which I am the administrator and to which it has since been updated.

Distal Effects — A proximate cause is an event that is closest to, or immediately responsible for causing, some observed result. This exists in contrast to a higher-level ultimate cause (or distal cause) which is usually thought of as the “real” reason something occurred.

In most crimes, we work backward from the outcome to those responsible. Money is missing from the till, and we look for the thief. Control often is literally hidden “behind closed doors.” In addition, as emphasized, coercive control as it pertains to domestic violence can also be difficult to detect because its means and effects merge with behaviors widely associated with women’s and children’s devalued status in personal life — being deferential, thrifty, thin, and unnoticed. Also, coercive control’s means and effects can merge with behaviors of the dominant cultural environment, giving meaning to “class.” For example, just like being too thrifty or thin is associated with some lower-class women’s behaviors, so too can being overweight, unemployed, sedentary, and dependent. These traits can be associated with “genetic inheritance” but they can also be the by-product of clandestine, invisible abuses that go unnoticed in the public eye.

The use of electromagnetic frequency against a subject/victim, a target for grooming behavior, can be very difficult to detect and uncover as well. First, electromagnetic frequency waves are invisible. Second, the onset of agitation or lethargy in a subject/victim may be observed but the reason for its occurrence misdiagnosed and attributed to something else entirely thereby allowing the unseen root cause to continue in the environment of the subject/victim. This obstruction, this ambiguity in the viewing details by those witnessing behaviors, can and will completely obliterate any truth to the proximate cause and effect thereby thwarting uncovering the real reason and meaning behind the abuse and render any meaning given to its proximate cause or distal effect invalid.

The strategic analysis assumes that our behavioral repertoires in these and other nontrivial facets of everyday life are relatively consistent, have identifiable temporal and spatial dimensions, and are unintelligible apart from the matrix of power in which they arise, the norms to which they respond, the relative benefits and sanctions they elicit in specific social and historical contexts, and the general consequences they effect. The proximate means and motives by which these strategies are implemented are a function of individual personalities, preferences, and situational variables as well as of their perceived efficacy, and the tactics selected tend to be spatially diffuse and highly individualized. Moreover, the pattern that makes these behaviors strategic is recognizable largely in retrospect. What marks behaviors as strategic is their collective reality, aggregate consequence, and the extent to which the link that joins this reality to its consequences is mediated by structural dimensions of the economy, polity, and civil life.

The subset of collective behaviors that encompasses how men and women constitute themselves as such, how they “do masculinity” and how they “do femininity” in a particular epoch at the range of sites where gender takes on its social meaning, including school, work, family, and intimate relationships. The substantive benefits/losses persons derive or experience from enacting these gender strategies constitute their “materiality.”

Thus, the “materiality of coercive control” refers to the tangible and symbolic visible results that men take advantage of, and to which are accrued from dominating and exploiting, not just their female partners, but those they come to gain power and control over. The substantive deprivations women and children suffer can be observed, but difficult to clearly define. Similar to the invisible electronic targeted assaults now happening to various individuals within the United States, this “materiality” can be defined as the benefits and losses that constitute what feminists have historically defined as the gender politic of a dominant male patriarchy. When the dominant gender enacts power over the subordinates, seldom does anyone consider electromagnetic frequency torture. This can mark the silencing imposed on individuality and the silencing of their sexuality as a part of their personhood and an ambiguous by-product of depravations inflicted as the result of this “materiality” in a dominant male politic. In the concept of materiality, its convention within the aspect of “auditing” within accounting practice relates to the importance or significance of an amount, the validity of a transaction, or discrepancy thereof. The objective of a financial audit is to enable the auditor to express an opinion as to whether or not the financial statements were prepared, in all material respects, to the conformity of a financial reporting framework such as in Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).

“What marks control is not who decides, but who decides who will decide; who decides what, whether, and how delegated decisions are monitored; and the consequences of making ‘mistakes.’”

Evan Stark, Coercive Control

Similarly, the use of electromagnetic frequency signals to arbitrarily stimulate or sedate the human mind or attack the body of victims seek to perform a similar audit, albeit an audit related to behavior or forced acceptance of another person’s opinion and/or domain.

Men set out to realize their individual purpose in the world, most do not seek out to become controllers. Establishing mastery over another independent adult in personal life is complex and difficult work for which there are no guide books, not even for “dummies.” If it is recognized at all, the fact of domination in personal life is usually perceived only indirectly through signs of assertion, command, dependence, and subordination within relationships. We see a controlling or a demanding husband or relative or servile or timid wife, but not the lines of power that join the power of control to its command. These are subtle elements that have contributed to invisible empires, invisible empires that have flourished throughout history in terrorizing fashion over minority groups. The Free Masons and the Ku Klux Klan are just two clubs that conducted their activities in secret and these invisible secret societies have gone on to re-organize and re-shape the social order.

Written by:Karen Barna

Mother, Daughter, Student, Graduate, Lover of Books, Reader of Philosophy, Interested in Psychoanalysis, Criminology, Sexual Deviance, Social Justice&Law

If we can’t say what electronic targeting and electronic torture “is”, how can we defend against it as a criminal act?

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A Concept in Crisis

Misleading truths that obscure the real nature of electronic targeting, electronic harassment, electronic assaults, and electronic torture compound the misunderstandings surrounding the phenomenon. In an academic paper entitled The Essence of Rape by Joanne Conaghan published in the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies (2019) states,

“…if perceptions of rape vary so extensively, how can it properly signify a shared understanding around which public debate may be conducted (Conaghan, 2019)?”

Likewise, this same problem exists with the phenomenon of electronically targeted individuals. These individuals claim government interference, police misconduct, police stalking and harassment, gang stalking by other citizens, and that they are being used as a part of “government secret operations in clandestine experiments of mind control.” One website has suggested the phenomenon of the electronically targeted individual’s most accurate description is “security-service stalking.” (Karlstrom, 2018) “Security-service stalking” is called “cyberstalking” by the FBI. (United States Attorney’s Bulletins & Journal of Federal Law Practices, May 2016).

I am going to try and weave an understanding between professional moral misconduct and the electronically targeted individual. Last night I watched a 20/20 documentary about the tragic death of Anna Nicole Smith (e.g., Viki Lynn Hogan) who was pronounced dead from a drug overdose and an abscess that infected her body at the site of an injection given to her by her personal psychiatrist, Dr. Khristine Eroshevich. The doctor who gave her the injection and wrote her the 10 prescription drugs Anna Nicole had in her system at the time of death eluded a prison sentence (Ceasar, 2015). She had all charges dropped and only one count, a misdemeanor, for writing a prescription drug, not in the name of the person it was intended. Since the law recognizes and guides how the structure of consent is established, was it perceived that Anna Nicole contributed to her own death because she had the money to pay an immoral doctor the necessary cash required for acquiring those needed prescriptions? Similarly, in cases of rape, the courts look at how “consent” was structured for the activity. Since the making of consent is not unfettered but not vested with one source; it is a dialectic between ordinary people and the law, and the social reality that orders relationships within a prescribed legal category. The law is not so much concerned with a person freely giving consent to engage in an activity, as much as it is with the social and moral value of the activity to which the person is consenting. If this is true then why was, psychiatrist Khristine Eroshevich, responsible for medical misconduct and the manslaughter death of Anna Nicole Smith, acquitted on practically all the charges (Associated Press, 2010)? It’s because consent isn’t enough to guarantee that a person’s behavior is moral. Yet we live in a world that evaluates a person behavior by looking at their accumulated wealth, their credit score, their bank accounts, how timely they pay their bills and taxes, level of education, along with security background checks, and none of those things provide any indication that the person actually possesses an ounce of morality. In the final court decision in the trial, People v. Samuels (1967), a case involving BDSM, the court wrote:

“It is a matter of common knowledge that a normal person in full possession of his or her mental faculties does not freely and seriously consent to the use upon his or her self of force likely to produce great bodily harm. Those persons that do freely consent to such force and bodily injury no doubt require the enforcement of the very [criminal] laws that were enacted to protect them and other humans (Weinberg, 2016).”

One might make the argument that Anna Nicole Smith was perhaps not of her right sound mind and body and that Dr. Eroshevich’s professional opinions were being influenced by the money and fame Anna Nicole Smith offered. The promise of lucrative cash payments and high profile, luxurious lifestyle in exchange for prescription drugs and doctor services, and how the subtle nuances of coercive control played back and forth in this scenario. But shouldn’t have Dr. Eroshevich’s professional training make her more responsible for the wrong done? Now, let’s make the leap from this sensationalized tragic case of a beauty queen to the phenomenon of the electronically targeted individual. Supply “On Demand.” [This pun was purposely intended to make my case because we now live in an age where wireless frequency (wi-fi) is made available on demand.] The addicted are a vulnerable population within our communities and, as such, require more protection under the law from those wishing to do them bodily harm. It’s not likely the addicted “freely” choose (for their actions may be unconscious to them) to impose “the force” (the long-term side effects of drug and alcohol use) against their bodies, but rather they are responding to unanalyzed and unconscious past trauma(s). Behavior resulting from a subjugating process, and “a psychic life of power” instilled in them from early childhood. If one is to undo the damage of a brain “hard-wired” for behavior then it would take a pretty strong force to influence and try and “change” its path. The new advances in medicine manipulating human consciousness utilize radio frequency and artificial electronic stimulation.

To say that, “Money is the God that rules all fools” is a gross understatement. To make the leap from the manslaughter charge Dr. Eroshevich should have been given to the phenomenon of the targeted individual isn’t too difficult. When we make the leap from the case of Anna Nicole Smith to the phenomenon of the electronically targeted individual we may see a very similar picture of moral misconduct, coercive control, and the taking of hostages which are all found in the phenomenon now known as electronic targeting, electronic assault, electronic harassment, electronic bodily torture which may be part of a hidden subculture possessing the disposable income, a large financial base of economic support, and the hidden network connections to ensure its continued operations.

Supply “On Demand” in Sadistic Enjoyments. If the outrage of sex play involving bondage and discipline is its insight into consensual sadomasochism as higher theater, then, we could also say, the phenomenon of the electronically tortured and assaulted target individuals also plays into this “higher theatre.” A theatre that involves cruelty as high entertainment. How can we make the phenomenon of the electronically targeted individual’s connection to “higher theatre and higher entertainment?” Is it through the connection of “On-Demand Services,” providers supplying us with the connection to tap into its security-service stalking nature? To argue that in acts of sadism the “dominant” has power and the “slave” has not is to read theater for reality, and it is to read the theatre of WAR. And here we arrive at the unveiling in the nature of some individuals’ primal scene fantasies which act out in bloody murderous aggression against their fellow man (Neidecken, 2016). How does this tie into BDSM and the electronically targeted, assaulted, harassed, and tortured individual? It ties in through man’s proclivity to demonize groups and the very human enjoyment derived from dehumanizing, degrading, and destroying, and stealing from those same groups. It is as Michael Foucault said,

“Sadomasochism, as Foucault puts it, “is not a name given to a practice as old as [Love]; it is a massive cultural fact which appeared precisely at the end of the eighteenth century, and which constitutes one of the greatest conversions of Western imagination: unreason transformed into delirium of the heart.” The sadism in bondage and discipline “plays the world backwards.” It plays it backward because it nudges us ever closer to our Neolithic ancestors and the savage beatings that made up humanity as a whole.

From Domestic Violence to Coercive Control. At the core of security-service stalking is coercive control and,

“the core of coercive control theory is the analogy to other capture crimes like hostage-taking and kidnapping, a comparison that illustrates its “generality.” The singular advantage of the analogy is that it links, not just women [and their children] to the large discourse of rights and liberties we apply to citizen-victims, including human rights discourse, implicitly undermining a major rationale that limits justice intervention in what are “deemed just family matters.” By using gender-neutral language of power and control to frame abuse, the hostage analogy also supports an approach woman have repeatedly used to gain legal rights men already possess, such as the right to vote or sit on juries. Called “formal equality,” courts or legislators are asked to imagine the wrong involved if men were denied these rights solely because of their sex, to attribute the observed lack of parity to discrimination, and then to level the playing field so that women are treated identically to men. From this vantage point, the right of abuse victims to “equal protection” reflects the resemblance of abuse to assault and other harms from which men and strangers are already protected. The analogy also supports the belief that battered women are “hostages at home,” suggesting abuse is a political crime like terrorism (Stark, 2007).”

Utilizing this understanding of domestic violence and the nature of coercive control used to carry out such violence, we can come to an understanding of “security-service stalking” and its analogy to hostage-taking and kidnapping. Acts the obstruct the exercise of a person’s full civil liberties. In short, imprisonment within the confines of an electromagnetic cage that tethers the human body electronically to a controller.

Sources:

Conaghan, .J. (2019). The Essence of Rape. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, 39(1),

Karlstrom, Dr. Eric. (2018). “In the Post 9/11 Era, Understanding the Targeted Individual Phenomenon is No Longer Optional (T. McFarlan).” GangStalkingMindControlandCults.com Published online January 10, 2018. Retrieved online February 8, 2021. https://gangstalkingmindcontrolcults.com/in-the-post-9-11-era-understanding-the-targeted-individual-phenomenon-is-no-longer-optional-t-mcfarlan/

“Cyber Misbehavior” (2016) United States Attorney’s Bulletin. Department of Justice. Vol. 64, №3. May 2016. https://www.justice.gov/usao/file/851856/download

Caesar, Stephen. (2015). “No jail time given to doctor in Anna Nicole Smith case.” Los Angeles Times. Published online April 17, 2015. Retrieved online Febraury 8, 2021 https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-doctor-in-anna-nicole-smith-20150417-story.html

“Anna Nicole Smith’s Doctor Acquitted in Drug Case, Psychiatrist and Boyfriend Convicted.” Associated Press. FoxNews.com. Published October 28, 2010. Retrieved online February 8, 2021. https://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/anna-nicole-smiths-doctor-acquitted-in-drug-case-psychiatrist-and-boyfriend-convicted

Weinberg, Jill D. (2016). Consensual Violence: Sports, sex and the politics of injury. Oakland, California. University of California Press.

Stark, Evan. (2007). Coercive Control: The entrapment of women in everyday life. New York. Oxford University Press.

Niedecken, D. (2016). The primal scene and symbol formation. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 97(3), 665–683.
Another source to considered not referenced here:

Perper, Joshua A., and Cina, Stephen J. (2010) “When Doctors Kill: Who, Why, and How.” New York. Copernicus Books. Excerpt:

“I am God, your Physician” (Ex. 15:26). The prophets also acknowledge God as a Healer and Jeremiah stated: “Heal us, and we will be healed” (from the blessing for healing, Jeremiah 17:14). Throughout the Torah, God is imbued with great healing powers. It is no wonder that it is written, “The Lord giveth, the Lord taketh away” when it comes to health, wealth, and life itself.”

WRITTEN BYKaren Barna

Mother, Daughter, Gardener, Student, Graduate, Cook, Care-Giver, Lover of Books, Reader of Philosophy, Interested in Psychoanalysis

Ethics of Extreme Porn: Are some kinds of sex intrinsically degrading, even if they’re consensual?”

Commercial Fetishism of BDSM

In the back of the book “Consensual Violence: Sex, sports and the politics of injury” by Jill D. Weinberg I found an online newspaper resource called The Atlantic and their published article “The Ethics of Extreme Porn: Is Some Sex Wrong Even Among Consenting Adults? A defense of consent as a lodestar of sexual morality.”The article discusses the ethos of consent in the practice of sexual bondage and discipline. The author seems to support the act of consent even in morally debasing acts of sexual pleasure. But what many people may not realize that what plays into these consensual depraved sexual acts is almost always a person’s personal history with abuse, and it most certainly plays into acts that are not consensual like rape and sexual assault. What is acted out in the bedroom in sex-play has been shaped by our early childhood experiences with the primal scene and one’s creative primal scene phantasies in response to a traumatic event. Conor Friedersdorf suggests reading the n + 1 magazines article “What Do You Desire?” which recounts a woman’s experience when a group of San Franciscans crowded into a basement to watch and participate as a diminutive female porn actress who has consented very specifically to being bound with rope, gagged, slapped, mildly electrocuted, and sexually penetrated in almost every way. Although this woman was a paid actress in a porn shoot, many who practice BDSM are victims of sexual and physical abuse. In the mindset of sexual freedom the article touts “You can have whatever you desire, even if you choose hell, then we will call it good, because it is freely chosen,” and brings you pleasure.” The result is the result of chaos and nihilism and when the only way to transcendence is believed to be through the indulgence of one’s sexual desires freely. In a world of human beings whose history details for us period irruptions of violence and excessive abuses of humanity, one must marvel that history’s most free, wealthy people “use their liberty to degrade each other and to choose to be degraded.” Consent isn’t enough to guarantee that sexual behavior is moral. Yet we live in a world that evaluates a person behavior by looking at their accumulated wealth, their credit score, their bank accounts, how timely they pay their bills and taxes, along with security background checks, and none of those things provide any indication that the person actually possesses an ounce of morality. In an excerpt from Weinberg’s book she writes:

“A second example reveals that courts set up a comparison between BDSM and sports to routinely vitiate a person’s consent on the basis of incapacity. In People v. Samuels (1967), the defendant filmed and starred in a pornographic movie where he unclothed, gagged, whipped, and lashed another man with a riding crop. During the trial, the defendant testified that the man fully consented to starring in and participating in the activities featured on the film. Although the prosecution never located the other man to testify, the court dismissed the possibility that the victim had the capacity to consent to this behavior: “It is a matter of common knowledge that a normal person in full possession of his or her mental faculties does not freely and seriously consent to the use upon his or her self of force likely to produce great bodily harm. Those persons that do freely consent to such force and bodily injury no doubt require the enforcement of the very [criminal] laws that were enacted to protect them and other humans.” Ultimately, the court concluded that “consent of the victim is not generally a defense to assault or battery, except in a situation involving ordinary physical contact or blows incident to sports such as football, boxing or wrestling (Weinberg, 2016, p. 10).”

Primal scene phantasies already have encoded in them the actions that make up the male-sexual and female-sexual stereotypes. Actions emanating out of this scene of early childhood may go on to provide the child sexual pleasure in actions that dehumanize and debase other objects. We see the primal scene played out in acts of war. It is a theatre stage set in the interest of “a theatre of cruelty” where power is derived from the belief that mastery is synonymous with dominance and that weakness is synonymous with submission and the female fate is beneath the power dominant phallic aggression, regardless of biological gender. It further complicates and exploits the gender politic by placing “submissives” in subservient positions and denying them power. It is a theatre stage not set inequality, but rather a representation of a disproportionate power dynamic. With regard to the law, the making of consent is not unfettered but not vested with one source; it is a dialectic between ordinary people and the law, the social reality that orders relationships within a prescribed legal category. The law is not so much concerned with a person freely given consent, as much as it is with the social and moral value of the activity to which she is consenting. The courts find the violence employed in acts of BDSM a vitiation of what the meaning of love is supposed to inscribe. That is, the violence of BDSM is seen as a depraved and corrupt invalidation of what love is supposed to entail. It is for this reason, even when consent is freely given, it will not be recognized by the courts.

I find it interesting that “mild electrocution” was used in the making of the pornography film against the diminutive female porn star and this makes me wonder about BDSM, in the theatre of cruelty, and the use of electromagnetic frequency stimulation on the bodies of targeted individuals suffering from electronic assaults.

The question remains. “Are some kinds of sex degrading or immoral even if they’re consensual?” What do you think?

Sources:

Friedersdorf, Conor. (2013). “The Ethics of Extreme Porn: Is Some Sex Wrong Even Among Consenting Adults? A defense of consent as a lodestar of sexual morality. The Atlantic. Published online May 16, 2013. Retrieved online February 7, 2021. https://www.theatlantic.com/sexes/archive/2013/05/the-ethics-of-extreme-porn-is-some-sex-wrong-even-among-consenting-adults/275898/

Witt, Emily. (2013) “What Do You Desire?” n + 1 Magazine. Issue 16: Double Bind. Published Spring 2013. Retrieved online February 7, 2021. https://nplusonemag.com/issue-16/essays/what-do-you-desire/

The Primal Scene and Symbol Formation: Why war and the electronically targeted individual

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Children playing war-games

The following writing considers the theory of Dietmut Niedecken and her psychoanalytic work exploring the primal scene and symbol formation.

Interpreting the Psychic Material

Alfred Lorenzer thinks that the traumatic experience consists of an “intolerable situation” that is available in phantasy being realized (1965, p. 693). If we consider what is being suggested is an “intolerable situation” represented in the fabric of the psyche that is generally dissolved in the fabric and only brought to bear when it is activated by a traumatic irruption, we can then make a connection with its connection to psychosis.

In considering potentially traumatic influences in early childhood, the primal scene was in focus in early psychoanalytic writings. The child is subjected to such an experience, to excitations that are overwhelming and therefore may have a traumatic impact. Freud thought the traumatic event of the primal scene was due to the child’s witnessing the parents’ act of intercourse. But some psychoanalysts believe the “primal scene” isn’t so much connected to witnessing the parents’ act of sexual intercourse as much as it is connected to how the parents treat one another in response to each other’s needs (e.g., in a loving and respectful way or in violent altercation and aggression). When aggressive arguments and physical fights are witnessed by the child, the child may experience traumatic side effects to the excitations that create cortical arousal and these excitations may be overwhelming for the child to process, and as a result, the child may have a hard time processing the event. This is most certainly connected with dissociative states and this becomes the difference between knowing and not knowing the trauma. Melanie Klein takes early phantasy formations as the “combined parent figure” and this combined parent figure is a particularly anxiety-inducing, fusional-destructive representation from the early stages of the Oedipus complex. The primal scene phantasy comes into being on the basis of projections of fear of abandonment, envy, and hatred that the child feels with regard to the parents’ sexual relationship from which he is excluded. Laplanche (2004) considered the primal scene the product of both the result of an event and a phantasy as the child works out the enigmatic message proceeding from the adults. In addition, according to Laplanche the phantasy is not arbitrary but an outcome of the child’s cultural environment which makes available to him for the translation of the enigmatic message of the primal scene some “general cultural . . . narrative schemata” (2004, P.908) These serve the binding and symbolization of the traumatizing enigmatic messages.

Many psychoanalysts have asked the question, “Why war?” And the answer to that question is, “War is how some children work out the enigmatic message of the primal scene (Mitzlaff and Niedecken, 2013, p. 87).” We see these enigmatic messages being played out all the time in child’s play when children will come together and play war-games. A very common game played when I was little was “Cops and Robbers.” In the war-games played by young children (mostly boys), one can observe the obvious encoding of the actions that make up the primal scene into male-sexual and female-sexual stereotypes, and the war scene itself is made up of the props and objects the child recognizes from television and computer games. As part of the primal scene symbolization what is acted out in the child’s game of war is a phallic-aggressive attack. Thus, the enigmatic message of the primal scene is in play here. In the journal paper The Primal Scene and Symbol Formation, Deitmut Niedecken writes:

“We can postulate that the children playing war have already developed a primal scene phantasy in which they assume the place of witnesses of excited events taking place between the parents. In playing, they are concerned now with further translating for themselves the enigmatic message of the primal scene. They are falling back on the metaphor of the war game, which operates as a cultural “translation aid (Laplanche, 2004, p. 908)”

Thus, there is a structure-forming aspect of the primal scene phantasy. Britton develops a concept called “The missing link” which positions a third person within the triangular space of the primal scene. This triangular space is bound by three persons of the Oedipal situation and all their potential relationships. This structure-forming space includes the possibility of being a participant in a relationship and observed by a third person as well as being an observer of a relationship between two people (Britton, 1989, p. 85).

Niedecken has shown when a child works out the exclusion from the primal scene the possibility of the “I think” position is made available and the protagonists of the primal scene are represented in grammar as “subject” and “object” and the relationship between them is governed by the predicate “Father-Subject has a Mother-Object.” I believe her German translates into a possessive form, as in “Father-Subject possess a Mama-Object.” That is, the father possesses the mother and the child is excluded from the sexual relationship.

If we consider it in this way, the development of verbal-discursive thinking is underpinned by an extremely violent, in fact, murderous phantasy and it is not surprising that children convey a perpetrator-victim relationship in their play. In this context, it is easily understood how the instrumentally dissecting external view proceeds from discursive language and allows a sadistic control over what is thought. This sadistic control and extremely violent and murderous discursive thinking underlie the machinery used during the Holocaust and can provide the reason for the sweeping tide of our planet’s self-destruction (Horkheimer and Adorno, 1973).

It is at this point in the paper Niedecken presents the possibility that exclusion from the primal scene may not be the only way a child interprets and experiences the primal scene. There is another possible way the child works through the experience as an inclusive member of the trio. She offers an example in music theory in which “two human voices can sing a love duet while an instrumental part accompanies it and adopts its own position towards it that is heard not as excluded by as belonging; in a fugue, two voices can join each other in a stretto, while a counterpoint is interwoven in it so that the three parts combine to produce an interwoven whole. Such forms of experience suggest to Niedecken that the primal scene experience must also be conceivable as a terzet, and she began to wonder where she could find such a form of the “primal scene as terzet (Niedecken, 2016).”

Niedecken offered two clinical examples of how children may experience the primal scene not as excluded but as included. She writes,

“In being together sexually, the parents do not have to exclude the child from their phantasies; instead, she can latently appear in them as its extremely welcome product, perhaps also as an oedipally desired participant; and the child can experience with them the excitation of the scene herself until the moment when she makes her own entrance and makes herself heard — as a counterpoint that is woven into the stretto of the fugue theme (Niedecken, 2016).”

It is important to note that this inclusion is in no way perverted, but rather demonstrates the healthy love between the two parents and towards the offspring him/herself. That is, the inclusion of a child in the primal scene is based on healthy reciprocity within the relationship, a relationship filled with respect, love, and caring that is consistently and actively demonstrated throughout.

With regard to the material that can be interpreted and analyzed in the phenomenon of electronic target assaults in the experience of the targeted individual, we can read its terzetto. We can read the unconscious unanalyzed fantasy of a child’s exclusion from the primal scene and the Father-Subject’s phallic aggressive attacks against his Oedipal Objects. In object relations theory we interpret the aggressor’s message as the phallic and potent father figure commanding and ordering his subjects/objects of his relational world.

It is my opinion, there is a tremendous lack of understanding in the research literature with regard to the prevalence of sadism in the world of non-incarcerated adults today, and how individual-specific sadistic traits contribute to the invisible crime of electronic targeting. It is also my opinion this phenomenon belongs to a subculture. A subculture interested in the “theatre of cruelty” in acting out a fantasy of control. It also utilizes the world of hi-tech electronic commercial fetishism (consumer hi-tech products) and biological implants that tethered together Objects with electronic devices, devices that act as counter-phobic objects warding off anxiety from these fear-inducing “threats.” Its action is bound to working out the enigmatic message from the child’s exclusion of the primal scene and it demonstrates the sadomasochism associated with other acts of BDSM. Please read further the link below.

STAGE VIOLENCE, POWER, AND THE DIRECTOR: Interpreting the evidence of electronic targeted assaults and body violations using electronic stimulation and radiofrequency — Proclivities’ Principle Wisdom (wordpress.com)

Sources:

Lorenzer, A. (1965). Ein Abwehrsyndrom bei traumatischen Verlaufen [A defensive syndrome in traumtic processes]. Psyche Z psychoanal 19:685–700.

Niedecken, D. (2016). The primal scene and symbol formation. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 97(3), 665–683. Video abstract of the paper: http://youtu.be/5XxKSQ3pgWw

Laplanche, J. (2004). Die ratselhafte Botschaft des Anderen und ihre Konsequenzen fur den Begriff des UnbewuBten im Rahmen der allgemeinen Verfuhrungstheorie [The enigmatic message of the other and its implications for the concept of the unconscious in the context of the genderal seduction theory]. Psyche Z psychoanal 58:898–913.

Mitzlaff, S. & Niedecken, D. (2013). Zerstorung des Denkens in Institutionen [Destruction of thinking in institutions]. Frankfurt: Brandes und Apsel.

Britton, R. (1989). The missing link: Parental sexuality in the Oedipus Complex. In Britton R., Feldman, M., O’Shaughnessy, E., editors. The Oedipus Complex Today: Clinical Implications, 83–101. London. Karnac Books.

Horkheimer, M. and Adorno, T.W. (1973). Dialectic of Enlightenment, Cummingm J. translator. London. Allen Lane.

Winnicott, D.W. (1971). “The use of the Object and relating through identifications.” In Playing and Reality. Harmondsworth. Penguin, 1980.

Musical source to consider regarding Niedecken’s theory of a primal scene terzet:

Gustav Holtz. (1925) Terzetto (Flute, Oboe, Violin) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_DsQFfehGE

WRITTEN BYKaren Barna

Mother, Daughter, Gardener, Student, Graduate, Cook, Care-Giver, Lover of Books, Reader of Philosophy, Interested in Psychoanalysis