Some Psychoanalytic Insights on the Psychology of Castration Fantasies and the Vanished Pregnant Body in Psychoanalytic Theory; Analyzing the Targeted Individual 

The Post-Female Pregnant Body and the healthy experience. Female psychoanalysts posit the importance of positive female body experiences especially when it comes to the female pregnant body and a little girl’s development of positive gender identity. The pregnant body with regard to symbolism and imagery has actually been omitted in theory building to date (2012). The absence of this icon of female body image development from cradle to grave suggests the gender politics of the 1970’s “who is wielding social power in the composition of theories in general (Balsam, 2012).” This theory would make absolute sense in curbing sadistic attacks toward female bodies (both from the masculine and feminine gender orientation).

Being a woman and a student of feminine psychoanalytic theory, I have come to believe that the person carrying out my electronic targeted physical assaults and psychotronic torture (assaults against the female body) possess an amalgamation of Freudian castration complex fears along with the sexual perverse fantasy of watching the female flesh expand thereby dehumanizing the target through rendering the target immobilized with diminished mobility and mental capacity. This is certainly what has happened to me when forced into sleep through electromagnetic stimulation/sedation thereby ushering in weight gain by blocking movement and exercise. This offers up a very interesting clue to the pernicious thoughts of the perpetrator. He/she very well may find pleasure in humiliating their targets. In addition, the perpetrator may find the thought of fat/inferiority/weakness/pregnancy extremely distasteful as it does not constitute a form of social capital in the ability that allows one to move freely within a woman’s environment. It has been said the most vulnerable position a woman can place herself in is in the state of pregnancy. Some people may associate “pregnancy” with “fat” and thereby inferior vulnerability. This is not surprising as the female expanding body, as in pregnancy and later, as women age are sometimes seen as the iconic “matriarch,” (the dead mother) can be viewed as just another humiliating aspect of patriarchy and Father Time’s denial of youthful beauty and playfulness. That is, as in sexual youthful playfulness (see the Paranoid Schizoid Position).

Many feminists have talked about this fear of the female body (fear of pregnancy and the fear of turning into one’s mother as women age; that iconic matriarch) lurking in the dark shadows of their own psyches and which promotes their hostility not only toward male dominance, but also hostility towards images of youthful beauty and anger at their own aging body. That is, their own aging body that represents the uncontrollable aspect of the pre-Oedipal terrain; ambivalence. This certainly plays into castration fantasies on multiple levels and not just towards the female self as seen in plastic surgery and invasive cosmetic treatments, but in the annihilation of Objects in one’s relational world (object relations theory) as observed in the paranoid-schizoid position and the repetitive assaults against female flesh in rape. The expanding aging body is just another aspect of this fear as the body loses elasticity with old age and is prone to weight gain and other bodily distortions that belong to aging. It’s not only women who possess these narcissistic fears (though they may be childish and infantile), but it is also men who possess these fears towards female flesh (the female pregnant body and the female aging body) as well as their own aging bodies. It is, for this reason, I contend that the Vanished Pregnant Body or Vanished Post-Delivery Body not only belongs to the psychology of women, but to men as well. If we consider the following written by Rosemary Balsam’s in “Women’s Bodies in Psychoanalysis” in Chapter 3, The Vanished Pregnant Body in psychoanalytic theory:

“A pregnancy [and therefore a pregnant body] might be viewed as female/inferior/irrational, being that most earthly of states, a symbol of woman as “body” to man’s “mind,” the fruit of guilt-laden sexual intercourse, the result of unseen meshing of ungovernable genetic codes. Even modern psychoanalytic clinical observations could be thus unwittingly affected so that pregnancy remains invisible in theory (or marginalized and bracketed in spite of the blatant presence and visual command of any pregnant woman who walks into a room of children and their richly evoked fantasies. …

The history of the medical vision of the female body suggests speculation on an abiding tendency in Western culture — in both men and women — the need to distort the female bodily configuration while making theories. My own speculations about how this may come about involve universal unconscious fears of pregnancy that are held by both men and women. This differs from the usual psychoanalytic view that the primary confusion about the anatomical distinctions between the sexes resides in concerns about phallic primacy (for both sexes — in their castration anxiety). We may not need to choose between the biological male or the biological female because major fears appear to involve both, rather than either/or.”

In this light of this information, we may also view the female pregnant body or large maternal body (post-delivery) with its enlarged breasts, buttocks, thighs, belly as that uncontrollable territory from infancy and childhood, and the division that separated us from her, that forever sought-after human flesh we find so maddening. It would be far too easy, and safe, to dismiss it as just another battle between the sexes. Safe, because this would help obscure and block any further required investigation into the subject matter and into what it really represents. Because that would expose its deviant perversion rooted in identity and problems with object relations. The creative perversion in transcending this fleshly boundary of maddening pre-Oedipal phase is found in the use of an electromagnetic tether and the use of the medical doctors that allow the perpetrator total control over his/her own fears surrounding that uncontrollable, ambivalent, maternal order. Perhaps, even as this creative perversion constitutes the balm for his/her own wounded narcissism that allows for the humiliation of the “Object Other” (see Jacobs, 2007, pp. 77–82). A humiliation that is rooted, not in empathy and compassion for, but in hatred and annihilation of an Object through paranoid fears.

And certainly, as a “fat body” and distorted female bodily configuration (body inflation fantasies and feeder fantasies) touch upon the inferior/irrational states of being and one that is of the most earthly of states (the human condition), guilt-laden uncontrollable indulgences at the pre-Oedipal breast, which ties into unconscious sexual fantasies in aspects of a forced nipple in the mouth as the canvas of that pre-Oedipal arrangement, and of the hedonistic sexual enjoyment that follows which are the roots of human intimacy and eventually sexual intercourse. The result of unseen meshing of the phallus with vaginal opening/mouth orifice. Nipple as phallus and life-giving nourishment and phallus as the nipple.

In the creation of a sexual perversion of the female body, that uncontrollable terrain becomes the controlled and governed Object that was once ungovernable and uncontrollable, perhaps even terribly unforgiving, to us. It is for this reason; the paranoid-schizoid position is part of both male and female abnormal development. The same paranoia that is rooted in the psychology of the male’s desire toward rape violence, is also rooted in the psychology of a female’s desire toward violence against the female flesh.

Sources:

Chasseguet-Smirgel, Janine. (1984). Creativity and Perversion. London. Free Association Books.

Rosemary Balsam. (2012). Women’s Bodies in Psychoanalysis. East Essex Canada. Routledge. (Chapter 3, The Vanished Pregnant Body)

Katherine Gates. (2000). Deviant Desires: Incredibly Strange Sex. New York. Juno Books.

Amber Jacobs. (2007). On Matricide: Myth, Psychoanalysis, and the Law of the Mother. New York. Columbia University Press.

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